How Long Will It Take For My Relaxed Hair To Go Natural?

Well, let’s see…. Forever! When you relax your hair the process is permanent. The relaxer causes permanent change to your natural hair. It destroys a big portion of the chemicals that give the wavy shape to your natural hair. Those hair chemicals (produced by the body)  also provide strength to your natural hair. If you want to go natural you will have to either slowly transition to natural hair, or do the big chop.      
     Your hair grows 1/2 an inch on average every month. If you do not want to do the big chop, the best thing you can do is to let your hair grow for at least 12 to 18 months, then remove the relaxed part of your hair. I transitioned for 8 or 9 months before I removed the relaxed part of my hair.  I recommend that you talk to your hair stylist to discuss your options. You can opt for different protective styles like wigs, braids, or weave if you don’t want to deal with two textured hair all the time, as two textured hair requires more care and patience. 

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What Is Traction Alopecia?

Naomi Campbell with Traction Alopecia

 Alopecia is simply a scientific term for “hair loss”. Traction Alopecia is hair loss caused by tension placed on the hair.

      Traction alopecia is a common cause of hair loss and has been traced to modern practices that include braiding and weaving, and the placement of hair extensions, and is seen both in children and adults.

      What happens is that the tension placed on the scalp due to these styling techniques (and often the added tension caused by the weight of extension hair) irritates the scalp and the hair follicles which are being pulled upon. This causes the hair to loosen from its follicular roots, but is only a secondary issue. The big concern here is the inflammation caused by the irritation of the follicles from the chronic tension. The follicles can become atrophied and damaged to the point where they will no longer produce terminal (the longer, thicker and darker) hair. When caught early, this type of hair loss is reversible, but prolonged traction can and will cause permanent loss of hair in the affected areas.

      The most common areas affected by traction alopecia are the forehead and temple regions, which are generally the areas that receive the most stress from the aforementioned styles. 
Is there a cure?
If the bad styling habits are swapped in time for better ones then the scalp may get better on its own in time but there are also a number of products/drug treatments available to help speed up recovery from the damage. However it may take some time to see any results if any at all. 
If you’re willing to cough up some cash then permanent hair loss can be treated with hair transplants although this cannot prevent another hair loss if the same hair styles that caused it in the first place are continued to be used.
If you are suffering from the symptoms of Traction Alopecia then change your hair style now if you do not want to lose anymore hair permanently.
Changing bad habits

  • If you wear small tight braids/plaits then loosen them up and do them larger.
  • If you wear tight weaves exchange a tight weave for a wig instead or just let your hair be as it is.
  • If you wear locs then avoid pulling these too tight or redoing them too tightly. If you are considering locs-ing up then go for medium sized locs instead of really large ones.
  • Loosen up your hair bands and avoid daily use of headbands that are very tight.


References: http://www.powertotheafro.com                      http://www.hairfinder.com           

What Is Traction Alopecia?

Naomi Campbell with Traction Alopecia

 Alopecia is simply a scientific term for “hair loss”. Traction Alopecia is hair loss caused by tension placed on the hair.

      Traction alopecia is a common cause of hair loss and has been traced to modern practices that include braiding and weaving, and the placement of hair extensions, and is seen both in children and adults.

      What happens is that the tension placed on the scalp due to these styling techniques (and often the added tension caused by the weight of extension hair) irritates the scalp and the hair follicles which are being pulled upon. This causes the hair to loosen from its follicular roots, but is only a secondary issue. The big concern here is the inflammation caused by the irritation of the follicles from the chronic tension. The follicles can become atrophied and damaged to the point where they will no longer produce terminal (the longer, thicker and darker) hair. When caught early, this type of hair loss is reversible, but prolonged traction can and will cause permanent loss of hair in the affected areas.

      The most common areas affected by traction alopecia are the forehead and temple regions, which are generally the areas that receive the most stress from the aforementioned styles. 
Is there a cure?
If the bad styling habits are swapped in time for better ones then the scalp may get better on its own in time but there are also a number of products/drug treatments available to help speed up recovery from the damage. However it may take some time to see any results if any at all. 
If you’re willing to cough up some cash then permanent hair loss can be treated with hair transplants although this cannot prevent another hair loss if the same hair styles that caused it in the first place are continued to be used.
If you are suffering from the symptoms of Traction Alopecia then change your hair style now if you do not want to lose anymore hair permanently.
Changing bad habits

  • If you wear small tight braids/plaits then loosen them up and do them larger.
  • If you wear tight weaves exchange a tight weave for a wig instead or just let your hair be as it is.
  • If you wear locs then avoid pulling these too tight or redoing them too tightly. If you are considering locs-ing up then go for medium sized locs instead of really large ones.
  • Loosen up your hair bands and avoid daily use of headbands that are very tight.


References: http://www.powertotheafro.com                      http://www.hairfinder.com           

How Often Should I Wash My 4b/4c Hair?

       if you wash your hair with shampoo more than twice a week, you are definitely over-shampooing your 4b/4c hair. At least this is what I have learned from experience. I used to wash my hair with shampoo at least three times a week. Now I only use a clarifying, sulfate free shampoo once a month, or as needed. Just because a shampoo is made with all natural products that does not mean that you should use it everyday. 
         4b/4c hair is the most fragile hair type. The hair patterns make it really hard for oil to travel up the hair shaft. This type of hair needs to be moisturized and conditioned very often to keep it soft and healthy.Most hair experts recommend shampooing African American hair 1-2 times per week unless you have a hair condition that requires you to shampoo your hair more often. 
        4b/4c hair should be conditioned daily. The hair should be rinsed with warm  water, washed with a good moisture based conditioner, then the hair should be rinsed again with clear, cool water. This process will make the hair easy to manage. A leave-in conditioner should be used after each wash, followed by a good oil to seal the moisture in your hair.

       

When Is The Best Time To Buy Your Favorite Hair Products?

The best time would be when yo need it, right? Wrong. The best time to buy your favorite hair products is when they are on sale and you can afford them. I am not an amazon.com junkie, but I do get most of my hair products online. Walgreens.com does have good sales some times. My local Kroger store has products for African American hair on sale very often.
    I really did some splurging last month. You know, tax return season. I needed the products that I bought and they were on sale at amazon.com. I think I bought six bottles of Scurl “No Drip” Activator moisturizers and three bottles of TREsemme Moisture Rich Conditioner with Vitamin E. I co-wash my hair a lot, so having a good conditioner around is always good. Most of you might already know that I am addicted to Scurl activator moisturizer. I go crazy when  I don’t have it around the house, and my 4b/4c hair loves it. You know you love a product when you keep going to the store to get more.

     Don’t wait until you need a product to buy it. You don’t have to buy all your hair products at once, but when you see that a product you love is on sale, use the little money that you have and buy one or two if you can afford it. Most hair products have very long shelf life; you don’t have to worry about them going to waste.